Canada Takes the Lead in Developing ISO Standard for Flushable Products

Canadian wastewater professional Barry Orr is one of the leaders of a work group proposing new ISO standards for flushable products. (picture from the Canadian Press)

Canadian wastewater professional Barry Orr is one of the leaders of a work group proposing new ISO standards for flushable products. He’s shown here with a mass of debris removed from a sewer pump station. (picture from the Canadian Press)

The Canadian Press wire service is reporting Canadian wastewater professionals are taking the lead in forming a work group with the International Standards Organization (ISO) in order to develop new flushability standards. The wastewater group, known as Municipal Enforcement Sewer Use Group (MESUG), hopes the new standards will help cut down on the amount of nondispersible debris clogging sewer systems around the world.

MESUG submitted the request for a new ISO  standard in January and in May the ISO Board approved their request to move forward. The process of developing an ISO standard typically takes 3-5 years, but the group hopes to complete the process in 2-3  years.

“Canada is at the forefront in addressing the flushability of these products. We’re leading the ISO, and we’re working with nations across the globe to make improvements. The toilet is not a garbage can. The consumers need to know that it can damage their own systems and it can damage the municipality’s systems, too.” – Barry Orr, MESUG Canada

Continue reading the article on The Telegram’s website >

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