Mandatory Labels on Wet Wipes – Violating Freedom of Speech?

The wet wipes industry has been under fire in the past few years.  The most recent lawsuit in D.C. that has landed on Judge James E. Boasberg of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia’s desk is cautionary labeling of flushable and non-flushable wipes. Boasberg issued a preliminary injunction preventing a single manufacturer to be targeted by the labeling law and stated that it was violating the First Amendment.

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson was surprised by the ruling and said  “It’s no more of a First Amendment issue, I would think, than telling tobacco companies what they have to put on packages of cigarettes,” Mendelson said.

Read the full article here.


The Wastewater Systems are taking the Biggest Hit on the Mulibillion Dollar Wipes Industry

The multibillion-dollar wet wipes industry has been expanding in the recent decade.  All the non-flushable wipes being flushed down the toilet are creating huge issues for the wastewater systems across the nation.

Many people use the wet wipes for convenience but fail to realize the consequences once the wipes have been flushed down the toilet.  The combination of grease, wipes, hair and other items create “Fatbergs”, which are massive globs of congealed cooking fat with wipes, and they are taking over!

The federal court has recently been involved with whether to classify wipes as flushable or non-flushable and how to label them correctly. Hopefully, in the coming year, the federal courts will help to minimize the wipes problem.

Read the full article here!

It’s a Toilet Not a Trash Can!

With over 300,000 sewage blocks per year in the UK and counting, it is time to make a change on how we dispose of “non-disposable” products.  Many are avoiding the warning signs and fail to realize that 93% of all sewage clogs are from “non-disposable” wipes.  Baby wipes, surface wipes and feminine hygiene wipes are just a few categories that are creating these massive clogs. Not only is it causing a nasty mess but the sewage spills are impacting the environment.  Do you want raw sewage in your community? Next time you flush wipes, remember, it’s a toilet, not a trash can!

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Preventing Plugged Pipes with “Pain in the Drain” Campaign!

No More Wipes

While flushable wipes are a convenient and easy answer for users, they cause big problems for local utility workers and an even BIGGER problem for the sewage lines! It is time to start sticking to your 3 Ps people! Tens of thousands of dollars are spent in Clark County Water Reclamation District unclogging sewage lines from flushable wipes annually and the Clark County is tired of it! “The reclamation district has a campaign aimed at educating the public about not flushing wipes and other items like prescription pills called Pain in the Drain.” Read more about it here….

SNL Mocks Baltimore’s ‘Fatberg’ Sewer Problems

Wipes Ready

A fatberg in the Baltimore sewage system got a mention in a recent “Saturday Night Live” “Weekend Update” segment.  “Maintenance workers in Baltimore say they have cleared an 140-ton ‘fatberg’ from the sewer system, which is made up of congealed fat and waste that will not break down,” “Weekend Update” host Colin Jost said.  “So good news, Baltimore:  The McRib is back.”   The Baltimore fatberg has been growing and was recently contributed to a 1.2 million gallon sewage overflow.  Work is in process to upgrade and to increase the capacity of the Baltimore sewer collection and treatment systems to prevent these types of overflows in the future.

Read more HERE.

Court Case Over a New D.C. Law Mandating What Wipes Can be Labeled “Flushable”

The flushable wipes industry is going to court over a new D.C. law mandating wipes can be labeled “flushable” only if they break apart in a short period of time after being flushed in typical sewer conditions.  Kimberly-Clark Corporation, which manufacturers Cottonelle, Scott Naturals and Pull-Ups flushable wipes alleges the law is unconstitutional because it tries to regulate businesses beyond the city.  The law takes effect January 1, 2018 and comes in response to the more than $50,000 a year D.C. Water spends to clear clogs caused by wipes with additional expenses to repair equipment damages by the wipes.  Learn more here